LHC data brought to life through music

Guest post by Chiara Mariotti


I first studied music at the Conservatorio di Torino when I was in high school but stopped during my university studies. I returned to music maybe 25 years later, when my kids started to play instruments (they play the trumpet and the saxophone). I felt great joy when I resumed playing and I discovered that I was still able to; my fingers were playing even without my conscious control of them. I soon joined the Thoiry harmony group (L'Echo du Reculet) and then enrolled at the local municipal school to take flute lessons again.

Visit CMS through the Power of the Internet

Each year, CERN welcomes around 100,000 visitors onsite. Many of these visitors take a short trip from the laboratory's main site in Meyrin to the French commune of Cessy to see one of humankind's modern scientific marvels: the CMS detector. The 14000-tonne detector is located in a vast cavern around 100 metres (or about 30 storeys) underground, with an adjacent cavern housing several data-collection and power-distribution devices.

Hacking together a cloud chamber

Science Hack Day [SHD] is a 48-hour-all-night event where anyone excited about making weird, silly or serious things with science comes together in the same physical space to see what they can prototype within 24 consecutive hours. Designers, developers, scientists and anyone who is excited about making things with science are welcome to attend – no experience in science or hacking is necessary, just an insatiable curiosity.

http://sciencehackday.org/about/

The gateway to CMS physics analysis

Guest post by Sudhir Malik, University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez


The CMS Physics Analysis Toolkit (PAT) tutorial, the fifteenth edition of which ran from 30 June to 5 July, has come a long way. Started January 2009, these tutorials have trained around 500 CMS physicists to use CMSSW, the CMS software framework for physics analyses.

Young collaborators get acquainted with CMS in first-ever induction session

CMS organised a special introductory session for newcomers and young members of our collaboration on 17 and 18 July. Two PhD students, Juska Pekkanen (Helsinki Institute of Physics & University of Helsinki) and Nairit Sur (Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai), recount their experience in this guest post.

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